Jinn Summoning and Sorcery is Back

We’re having an interesting conversation about some new Jinn magic texts over on Studio Arcanis.  This post comes from that discussion, given that Jinn magic seems to be making a comeback.  I just read Corwin Hargrove’s Practical Jinn Magick: Rituals to Unleash the Power of the Fire Spirits.  And, though this post isn’t a proper review of that book, I liked it and want to mention it here.

Intrepid and curious magicians might want to investigate it.  That said, there are other worthwhile texts available that might give some foundation.  I’ve enjoyed Legends of the Fire Spirits: Jinn and Genies from Arabia to Zanzibar by Robert Liebling. It’s not a book of magic, but it’s definitely a book that feels magical, if that makes any sense. Another good one is Islam, Arabs, and the Intelligent World of Jinn by Amira El-Zein. A smart magician could draw a lot of inspiration from these two alone.

As far as practical books are concerned (apart from Jinn Sorcery, which, like all Scarlet Imprint books, is beautiful first and useful second), two others immediately come to mind. There’s S. Ben Qayin’s Book of Smokeless Fire (which Hargrove indirectly dismisses) and which I haven’t read and am not interested in. Then there’s Baal Kadmon’s Jinn Magick: How to Bind the Jinn to do Your Bidding, which is the highly simplified approach Hargrove criticizes in his book. Hargrove doesn’t name Kadmon’s book directly, but he says:

You have to be careful with simplification. One author recently wrote a book that simplifies Jinn Magick to the point that, in my opinion, the magick isn’t there anymore. His ritual form does nothing more than call to the Jinn King, with no structurally sound opening framework, direction, protection or any allusions to named Jinn. It’s a book that could be seen as either useless or dangerous, and to an extent that depends on the person using it, but it’s an example of what I can find disappointing about the over-simplified approach. I hope that what you get here has more meat than his book, without the convolutions set out by some older systems.

The thing with Kadmon’s books is that they seem like beginner texts but you actually have to be fairly confident and experienced to make them work (like many Finbarr, Parker, and Starlight texts). I think this is what Hargrove means when he says using it “depends on the person,” but it seems like a low blow. He also takes a shot at Nineveh Shadrach, calling Magick That Works overrated. I am surprised Al-Toukhi also didn’t draw some insults, given that Red Magick has been one of the few relatively well-known Jinn magic books in the West. It’s clear that Hargrove consulted Red Magick or at least is aware of it because he lists the book in his bibliography.

I was disappointed that Hargrove criticized Kadmon and Shadrach because I’ve gotten a lot out of both of these authors. Moreover, Hargrove is a solid spellbook writer in the Gallery of Magick vein (even if he claims not to be part of that group) and really doesn’t need to disparage the competition. His work is good and can stand on its own.

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